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dosimetry

Expanded Imaging Standards Being Proposed

Joint Commission seeks to expand imaging standards

By Wayne Forrest, AuntMinnie.com staff writer

August 15, 2013 — The U.S. Joint Commission has proposed more-stringent requirements in the ambulatory care, critical access hospital, and hospital accreditation programs for facilities that provide CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, and PET services.

“Research has indicated that the current Joint Commission requirements need to be enhanced to address several significant quality- and safety-related issues associated with diagnostic imaging,” the commission stated in its proposed revisions.

A number of revisions have been suggested. For example, facilities that provide CT, PET, or nuclear medicine services would be required to monitor radiation exposure levels for all staff and licensed independent practitioners who routinely work with those modalities. The commission noted that the precautions are typically addressed with exposure meters, such as personal dosimetry badges.

The facilities would also be required to take “appropriate actions to keep staff radiation exposure levels below regulatory limits.”

Facilities that provide MRI services would need to restrict the access of everyone not screened by staff to an area adjacent to the MRI scanner room entrance, and also ensure that this restricted area is controlled and supervised by MRI-trained staff. In addition, signs must be posted at the entrance to the MRI scanner room that state the magnet is always on.

The newly proposed rules also mandate a shielding integrity survey of rooms where ionizing radiation will be emitted or radioactive materials will be used or stored, such as scanning and injection rooms.

 

Small Doses of Radiation Linked to Cancer

According to the Environmental Protective Agency (EPA), small amounts of radiation can be linked to an increase in cancer. According to the EPA, exposure to one 1 rem of ionizing radiation in small doses over a lifetime will increase your risk of getting cancer. To put this in perspective, most people receive about 3 tenths of a rem (300 mrem) every year typically in the form of radon. There has been a lot of debate recently about the underutilization of safety measures for individuals exposed to radiation (much of which is in the work place). Med-Pro, Inc. is an advocate for radiation monitoring for those exposed to any amount of radiation over 300 mrem. Dosimetry badges (tld badges) have proven to be the industry standard for passive radiation detection. Let us partner with you to safeguard your employees and your business. Visit us at www.med-pro.net.

How Does Radiation Affect Our Life Expectancy?

How Does Radiation Affect Our Life Expectancy?

How does radiation affect our life expectancy? Are everyday activities negatively impacting your life expectancy? Does flying in an airplane or watching TV expose you adversely and put you at risk? Many are surprised to find out that simple, every day activities can possibly shorten their life expectancy. Cosmic radiation can from flying extended periods of time can possibly have an impact on your health. Deemed safe by most, does ionizing radiation emitted from television and computer screens adversely affect us? Are you at risk? Do you know how much radiation exposure is impacting you?  Will radiation affect your life expectancy?

This is an amazing link that will help put things in perspective.  http://www.physics.isu.edu/radinf/risk.htm


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